Into the White

Rupert Grint’s Rave Reviews – Into the White


“It’s nice to see Grint show off more sides to himself than what he was able to do in the “Harry Potter” films; here, he provides a great comedic timing while carrying the underlying anxiety that the situation requires.”

dagbladet (translated by Malene, you’ll find the whole translation here.)


“Florian Lukas (Lieutenant Schopis) is particularly impressive, whose face shows vulnerability behind the straight façade, and Rupert Grint who gets to showcase his comedic inventory with his cocky Liverpool comments.”

vg.no (translated by Malene, you’ll find the whole translation here.)


“Lachlan Nieboer is believable as the self-assured British upper-class Officer while Rupert Grint shows a greater range as an actor in the role as a gunner than he had the chance to do in the Harry Potter films.”

p3.no (translated by Malene, you’ll find the whole translation here.)


“The icing on the cake is perhaps the fact that Private Robert Smith is played by Harry Potter star Rupert Grint.”

h-a.no (translated by Malene, you’ll find the whole translation here.)


“All the characters are carefully nuanced and played with warmth and depth by the talented actors. Rupert Grint stands out with his rebellious and cheeky Liverpool gunner, together with our own Stig Henrik Hoff as the little talkative German, Strunk. The relationship between the two is perhaps the best thing about the entire film.”

filmsnakk.com (translated by Malene, you’ll find the whole translation here.)


“The dialogue works well and the characters are believable and played by talented actors.”

side3.no (translated by Malene, you’ll find the whole translation here.)


“At the same time, we are witnessing an ensemble play of a certain degree, performed by actors who perfectly inhabit their types and characters.”

bt.no (translated by Malene, you’ll find the whole translation here.)


“An exciting team of actors has been assembled in the Norwegian mountains to make a feature film out of the war history.
[...]
Harry Potter star Rupert Grint does a good job in an adult-film debut as the rebellious and big-mouthed Robert Smith, gunner in the British plane.”

oblad.no (translated by Malene, you’ll find the whole translation here.)


“Petter Næss has succeeded in creating a believable dialogue in English, German and Norwegian. Nature works beautifully as a backdrop and the atmosphere inside the cabin is tense. The very first minutes are shamed by the fact that both the Brits and the Germans sound like parodies of themselves. The chamber play in the cabin works best when the guys start to get to know each other.”

h-avis.no (translated by Malene, you’ll find the whole translation here.)


“And they have put together quite a team of characters! Sparks fly from every character portrayal, and the casting is so right, I can’t remember having seen anything better ever.
It’s incredibly refreshing to see Rupert Grint removed from the Potter-universe and put into this kind of film. It’s also nice that he has picked this particular role as pilot Smith after having swum in offers. And he made the right decision. He reveals both a depth and a great comedic talent in his inventory and brings forth both laughter and tears.”

ranablad.no (translated by Malene, you’ll find the whole translation here.)


“Luckily, the director has picked talented actors to shape distinctive characters and lets them speak a believable mixture of German and English.
[...]
Robert Smith (Rupert Grint), who spews his contempt towards Nazis in a popular manner. Great character portrayal.

aftenbladet.no (translated by Malene, you’ll find the whole translation here.)


“Director Petter Næss presents a powerful character study of human dignity with a magnificent international cast: such splendid actors as Florian Lukas, David Kross and Rupert Grint find perfect chemistry in this emotionally explosive drama.”

filmfest-oldenburg


“Thankfully, the cast has a high level of chemistry, [...] Rupert Grint also holds his own corner of the cabin as the cocky Liverpudlian airman, willing – and able – to turn a seemingly harmless sounding anecdote, into an anti-Nazi insult in the last six syllables. Unleashing his blunt-edged, Hitler-bashing humour in a cabin with three downed German pilots earns him a kind of reluctant respect from the Germans that is all part of his senior officer’s plan.”

subtitledonline.com


“The English side is pretty much told through the eyes of Gunner Robert Smith played by Rupert Grint. His role of over the top Liverpudlian, who strikes up an expected friendship, is a heart warming one.”

cinemaroll.co


“Rupert Grint shines in this robust WWII chamber piece about downed German and English fighter pilots scrabbling for survival. [...] The performances are uniformly strong, though Rupert Grint wins best in show for his charismatic and unflappable Scouse darts champ who takes great joy in rubbing his severe German compatriots up the wrong way. His accent, too, is note perfect, and the film is a far better showcase for his performing talents than any of the Harry Potter films.”

littlewhitelies.co


“What sets CROSS OF HONOUR apart is its performances; each and every one of the main five cast members excels, refusing to succumb to shallow stereotypes (though oft straying dangerously close). On the British side, upper class boy Lachlan Nieboer is Captain Davenport, accompanied by his working class Liverpudlian gunner Smith (Rupert Grint). Luckily, there’s no twaddle about class differences here: the pair play off each other succinctly. There is a war going on, after all. [...] Rupert Grint is the biggest name attached but certainly doesn’t steal the show (despite his fantastic accent) [...] But even then it’s hard to single one out when the entire principal cast does so well. CROSS OF HONOUR achieves in its human component what it fails to achieve in its story: a reason to watch.”

thehollywoodnews.com


“Although the bi-lingual dialogue’s a little stilted, the cast, including former Ron Weasley Rupert Grint (stretching himself as a Scouse gunner) and the dignified Florian Lukas (North Face), acquit themselves well, forging convincing and ultimately moving relationships as they learn how little petty political differences mean when starvation’s at the door.”

totalfilm.com


“The performances across the board are all impressive also, as all five of our protagonists continue to not fully trust one another for the vast majority of this movie [...] Grint has does well in proving there is life for himself after Harry Potter – joining both Daniel Radcliffe (The Woman in Black) and Emma Watson (The Perks of Being a Wallflower) in moving on swiftly and successfully. If Grint wants to avoid typecasting in the future and purely being known as Ron Weasley, then playing a brash Scouse soldier in a WW2 movie is certainly the right way to go about it.”

thefancarpet.com


“The film really becomes worth seeing by its cast, because next to the German actors Florian Lukas and David Kross, Rupert Grint shines on the opposite site. Who is known better as Ron Weasley of the Harry Potter films.”

Tagesspiegel.de


“The performances are uniformly secure and expressive, with Grint unleashing some potent streetwise attitude…”

blu-ray.com


“A chamber antiwar play from the studio of Lars Von Trier, in which Rupert Grint (Ron Weasley in the “Harry Potter” saga) demonstrates (displays) outstanding dramatic talent as a rampageous British pilot.”

Time-Out Moscow (translated by Maria)


“Lachlan Nieboer played the British officer without any false note, and Rupert Grint (unforgettable Ron Weasley from the popular Harry Potter franchise) successfully embodied the image of the second British pilot.”

Kino-teatr.ru (translated by Maria)


“Comical Sergeant is constantly taunted by the fiery redhead bully Smith, who is brilliantly portrayed by Rupert Grint.”

Izvestia (translated by Maria)


“The film has a great cast. Rupert Grint brings some merriment to the film with his witty lines and antics, while remaining serious.”

Sutki.net (translated by Maria)


“… Each of them plays an important role, there are no major and minor characters. The cast indicates it: the parts of the junior soldiers are played by the German David Kross and the English Rupert Grint, who, in spite of their young age, have acting experience and International film festivals awards under their belts. Each of them brilliantly illustrates the drama of the war.”

Interfax Belorus (translated by Maria)


“First, “Into the White” actually features a post-”Harry Potter” Rupert Grint, which is actually pretty exciting in its own right. After all, it’s not like Grint has done much outside of Potter, so seeing him take on something so fundamentally opposite is a bit of a surprise. He’ll actually do a very sound job all told, and makes a surprisingly believable World War II airman. This isn’t to say that the rest of the cast isn’t also turning in a terrific set of surprisingly believable performances, not by any means; this is to say, however, that Grint is just one high point among many, particularly noteworthy for his past career and this rather substantial deviation.”

Technology Tell


“[p]layed by Rupert Grint (who demonstrates a greater maturity and range than we’ve seen before, speaking in a thick, regional accent that sounds remarkably like Lister from ‘Red Dwarf,’ but also hinting at a solid career outside of the ‘Harry Potter’ franchise)…”


High-Def Digest


“None of this would matter without superb acting – and INTO THE WHITE features outstanding performances from the entire (albeit very small) cast. The biggest surprises for me were actors Florian Lukas from Germany as the Nazi Lieutenant, Stig Henrik Hoff as the German Sergeant, and Rupert Grint (who we all remember as the irresistibly cute Ron Weasley from the Harry Potter films). Lukas leads his men with authenticity while dealing with his own doubts, but the truly magic scenes occur as a friendship slowly develops between Hoff’s Strunk and Grint’s Gunner Robert Smith. You can’t help but care for these men as they slowly allow their preconceptions to melt away in the snowy Norwegian landscape.”

Flix 66


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